Levels of Processing

A theory suggesting deeper information processing leads to improved memory retention.

What it is

It is a framework for memory research, which suggests that the depth of information processing influences an individual's ability to remember it. This concept proposes three levels of processing: shallow (processing based on physical and sensory aspects), intermediate (processing based on recognition and labeling), and deep (processing based on semantic, meaningful, and symbolic characteristics). The deeper the level of processing, the easier the information is to recall.

How to use it

Improving User Onboarding with Levels of Processing

One way to increase conversions and retention for a tech startup is to use Levels of Processing in the user onboarding process. This theory suggests that users are more likely to remember information if they are encouraged to process it at a deeper level. For example, instead of just showing new users a tutorial video, encourage them to interact with the software. This could be in form of quizzes, challenges, or tasks that require them to apply what they have learned. This deep processing of information will enhance their understanding of the software and increase the likelihood of them continuing to use it.

Using Levels of Processing in Content Marketing

Another way to apply Levels of Processing in a tech startup is in content marketing. The theory suggests that information processed at a deeper level is more likely to be remembered. Therefore, instead of simply providing information to potential customers, engage them in a way that they process the information deeply. This could be through interactive blog posts, webinars, or eBooks. For instance, instead of just writing about how the software works, create an interactive post where readers can click on different parts of the software to learn about its features. This deep processing of information will increase the likelihood of them remembering your product, thereby increasing conversions.

Improving Customer Support with Levels of Processing

Levels of Processing can also be applied in customer support to increase retention and engagement. For instance, instead of just providing answers to customer queries, engage them in a way that they process the information deeply. This could be through interactive tutorials, quizzes, or problem-solving tasks. By doing so, customers are more likely to understand and remember the solutions, reducing the probability of repeated issues and increasing their satisfaction with the service, thereby increasing retention.

Enhancing Email Marketing with Levels of Processing

Using Levels of Processing theory in email marketing may increase engagement and conversions. Instead of just sending information about the product or service, engage the recipients in a way that they process the information deeply. This could be through interactive content in the emails, such as quizzes, puzzles, or challenges related to the product. By doing so, recipients are more likely to remember the information in the email and engage with the product, thereby increasing conversions.

Using Levels of Processing in User Interface Design

Another application of Levels of Processing in a tech startup is in the design of the user interface. The theory suggests that users are more likely to remember and engage with information if they process it deeply. Therefore, instead of just displaying information, design the interface in a way that encourages users to interact with it. This could be through clickable elements, drag and drop features, or interactive tutorials. This deep processing of information will enhance user engagement and increase the likelihood of them continuing to use the software.

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